Al-Qaida group is operating on ransom money from the West

By Ken Dilanian
Los Angeles Times

Print
Reprint
Subscribe
Add This

WASHINGTON: Dominik Neubauer stared into the camera, the steel barrel of an assault rifle pointed at his head.

A Yemeni “tribe” had taken him hostage, the 26-year-old Austrian student said in English, a tear rolling down his left cheek. If they aren’t paid a ransom, he continued, “they will kill me seven days after this video is published.”

In May, three months after the video appeared on YouTube, Neubauer was freed along with a Finnish couple who had also been kidnapped near an Arabic language school in Sanaa, Yemen’s capital. Multimillion-dollar ransoms were paid for their release, Yemeni and Western officials said.

The three were seized not by a tribe but by al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, the officials said — the group that has been trying for years to blow up U.S. airliners and overthrow the Western-backed government in Yemen. The ransoms went into the group’s coffers, the officials said.

Over the last two years, AQAP, as Western officials refer to the group, has extorted $20 million in ransom money, according to an estimate by Alistair Burt, who until this month was the top British diplomatic official for the Middle East.

If those payments continue, “AQAP’s attack capability in Yemen and against its friends and neighbors will only strengthen,” he said at a recent diplomatic meeting in New York. Kidnapping has become the group’s single largest source of funds, U.S. and European officials say.

Much of the money comes with the complicity of Western governments that have rebuffed British and American exhortations not to pay ransoms, the officials allege. The governments of Finland and Austria said they did not provide ransom money to terrorists. But two Western officials, speaking on condition of anonymity to avoid publicly criticizing allied governments, said that those denials are for public consumption and that the size of the ransoms shows government involvement.

The al-Qaida affiliate’s leader, Naser Abdel-Karim Wahishi, boasted of the money his organization brings in through kidnappings in a May 2012 letter to leaders of an allied group in North Africa. The document was found by Associated Press reporters in Mali.

“Kidnapping hostages is an easy spoil, which I may describe as a profitable trade and a precious treasure,” the letter said.

“Thanks to Allah, most of the battle costs, if not all, were paid from through the spoils,” the letter said.

Ransom money helped fund the group’s 2011 effort to seize and hold towns in southern Yemen, U.S. and European officials say.

Al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula turned to kidnapping in part because of successful Western efforts to crack down on its traditional funding sources, including money transfers from wealthy Persian Gulf Arabs, U.S. intelligence officials say.


TOTAL ACCESS:
© 2014 The Akron Beacon Journal  ●  Ohio.com  ●  Enjoy  ● 44 E. Exchange Street, Akron, Ohio 44308